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Tales From The Haunted Sea

There is no better time for ghost stories than winter with its dark, foggy evenings; the stories that have been frequently swapped and passed on at sea and have become the folklore of the seas more often than not involve ghost or phantom ships. Phantom or ghost ships are said to be supernatural visions that disappear as quickly as they appear on the horizon and of course, always signal a tragic fate. Some stories have a base in true stories whilst others are rumors that have become almost believable truths. Of course, some will be a mix of both. For a little taste, here's one of the most renowned.

The Flying Dutchman:
Pixabay
The account of this Dutch warship originates from the seventeenth century and is thought to be founded on reality. The vessel, captained by Hendrick Vanderdecken, set sail from Amsterdam in 1680, headed for Batavia, in Dutch East India. While adjusting the notorious Cape of Good Hope it experienced a sudden, serious tempest and as opposed to heading for a sheltered harbor, the chief is said to have sworn that he would keep up his heading until Judgment Day regardless of the possibility that he was unceasingly condemned for his activities. He is even said to have gone frantic and killed his first mate. As conditions compounded the vessel wallowed and all the group died. The ship was never observed again, aside from those numerous sightings of a ghostly vessel have been accounted for in the zone of the Cape and it is accepted by some that as discipline for his ineptitude, Vanderdecken and his ship were bound to cruise those waters for endlessness. The spirit of the ship should be the most exceedingly bad conceivable sign of fate and dependably occurs in the most noticeably awful of climates.



One of the principal sightings of the ghost vessel was in 1835 when the skipper and group of a British ship recorded that they saw it moving toward them in a vicious tempest. It was close to the point that they feared a crash until it all of a sudden vanished as fast as it showed up.

In March 1939 there were sightings off the shoreline of South Africa by many individuals on the shoreline. Albeit huge numbers of them most likely did not realize what a seventeenth-century vessel appeared as though, they could give itemized depictions of the pontoon. Similarly as some time recently, the ghost ship vanished like a phantom as they viewed.

Indeed, even George, Prince of Wales, the future King George V, guaranteed to have seen the Dutchman in 1880. He and his senior sibling were on a voyage with their coach when the vessel seemed close on their bow in a red shine. Thirteen individuals on board were said to have seen her before she vanished and the locating was trailed by catastrophe as the sailor who had initially announced the locating tumbled to his passing from the cross trees.

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